Good Society Forum: The resurgence of traditional media during COVID19

Wednesday, May 6, 2020 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
Online
The coronavirus health crisis has brought renewed focus – and hope - to ‘traditional media’ – newspaper, radio and TV. With millions staying at home because of the travel restrictions, demand in established outlets has surged. More audiences are tuning in to traditional media outlets, according to recent surveys. But how long will this last? Has this health crisis overturned the ongoing survival crisis for traditional media? The Good Society Forum brings together four media professionals …
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The coronavirus health crisis has brought renewed focus – and hope - to ‘traditional media’ – newspaper, radio and TV. With millions staying at home because of the travel restrictions, demand in established outlets has surged. More audiences are tuning in to traditional media outlets, according to recent surveys. But how long will this last? Has this health crisis overturned the ongoing survival crisis for traditional media? The Good Society Forum brings together four media professionals to look beyond ratings and explain the opportunities and challenges for ‘traditional media’ outlets highlighted by this global pandemic. Please join us for a webinar panel hosted by Emma Sky (Director, Yale World Fellows) and Nizam Uddin (Senior Head of Mosaic and Community Integration, The Prince’s Trust, and 2019 World Fellow). Our panelists are: Emma Graham-Harrison: Senior International Affairs Correspondent at The Guardian and Observer. Monika Halan, Consulting Editor with Mint in India (2011 World Fellow) Vincent Ni: BBC correspondent (2018 World Fellow) Raymond Mujuni: Editor with the Nation Media Group in Uganda. The Good Society Forum is a community of change-makers around the world with a common quest to build the good society. Launched in April 2020 during the COVID-19 pandemic, the Good Society Forum Webinars digitally connect change makers around …
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Good Society Forum: Health on the front lines

Sunday, May 10, 2020 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
Online
The first coronavirus case in Africa was confirmed in Egypt on 14 February. Since then it has spread across the continent. Bill Gates warned that it could claim millions of lives in Africa. Yet as of early May, 1,800 have died. Whereas US has 207 deaths per a million people and the UK has 419, Liberia has 4 deaths per a million and Somalia 2. The Philippines has 6 deaths per million. Is the lower …
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The first coronavirus case in Africa was confirmed in Egypt on 14 February. Since then it has spread across the continent. Bill Gates warned that it could claim millions of lives in Africa. Yet as of early May, 1,800 have died. Whereas US has 207 deaths per a million people and the UK has 419, Liberia has 4 deaths per a million and Somalia 2. The Philippines has 6 deaths per million. Is the lower than expected death rate due to a young population, warm weather, BCG vaccinations against tuberculosis? On Sunday, the Good Society Forum brings together health professionals in Liberia, Philippines, and Somalia to discuss the situations in their countries, how their health systems are coping, the actions governments have taken, and what they have learned. Please join us for a webinar panel hosted by Emma Sky (Director, Yale World Fellows) and Nizam Uddin (Senior Head of Mosaic and Community Integration, The Prince’s Trust, and 2019 Yale World Fellow). Our panelists are: Dr Deqo Mohamed: a Somali doctor who is Founder of Hagarla Institute (2016 Yale World Fellow) Ibrahim Ajami, a Liberian doctor and Founder Medical Consortium Outreach Program (2017 Yale World Fellow) Beverly Lorraine Ho: from the Philippine’s Department of Health (2019 Yale …
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Good Society Forum: Why Have Minorities Suffered Most From COVID-19?

Wednesday, May 13, 2020 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
Online
Whilst everyone is at risk of catching COVID19, it has become apparent that the impact of the pandemic is not being felt equally, particularly in the most developed nations of the world. Data from the UK Government shows that ethnic minorities have statistically significant raised risks of death involving COVID19 than those of white ethnicity, with black males 4.2 times more likely, and black females are 4.3 more likely. In Norway, 6% (453) of all …
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Whilst everyone is at risk of catching COVID19, it has become apparent that the impact of the pandemic is not being felt equally, particularly in the most developed nations of the world. Data from the UK Government shows that ethnic minorities have statistically significant raised risks of death involving COVID19 than those of white ethnicity, with black males 4.2 times more likely, and black females are 4.3 more likely. In Norway, 6% (453) of all COVID cases were among the 0.05% population that were born in Somalia, whilst in the United States, counties with higher African-American populations account for more than half of all COVID19 cases and almost 60% of deaths. Is this because ethnic minorities are more prone to underlying health conditions or is there more to this? On Wednesday, the GSF brings together experts from the UK, US and Norway to discuss the situations in their countries, and to better understand why some minorities are bearing a disproportionate brunt of the COVID19 impact. Join us for a webinar panel hosted by Emma Sky (Director, Yale World Fellows) and Nizam Uddin (Senior Head of Mosaic and Community Integration, The Prince’s Trust, and 2019 Yale World Fellow). Please register via Zoom here: …
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Good Society Forum: Should we be looking to cities for leadership in a post-COVID world?

Online
More than half of the people in the world now live in cities and by 2050 that number is expected to rise to 68%. Cities and concentrated urban centres are where wealth and power are concentrated in most countries. During the COVID-19 crisis we have seen leadership from devolved authorities that have been absent from national and federal governments, highlighting the importance of dynamic cities in local, national and international governance; showcasing their resilience to …
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More than half of the people in the world now live in cities and by 2050 that number is expected to rise to 68%. Cities and concentrated urban centres are where wealth and power are concentrated in most countries. During the COVID-19 crisis we have seen leadership from devolved authorities that have been absent from national and federal governments, highlighting the importance of dynamic cities in local, national and international governance; showcasing their resilience to national populist sentiment and drawing attention to the threats of regression should local government finances be undermined. Marvin Rees, Mayor of Bristol (UK) and 2010 Yale World Fellow will join other global city leaders to understand whether cities are where citizens will now look for their leadership and which will now be the primary engine for growth and innovation, particularly in a post-COVID world. Please join us for a webinar panel hosted by Emma Sky (Director, Yale World Fellows) and Nizam Uddin (Senior Head of Mosaic and Community Integration, The Prince’s Trust, and 2019 Yale World Fellow). Please register via Zoom at https://yale.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_aP1UtLYiTyWIaNOkl8oF2g. Good Society Forum is a community of change-makers around the world with a common quest to build the good society. Launched in April 2020 during …
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Good Society Forum: Campaigning for election in a post-COVID world

Online
The coronavirus will change the way we live. The pandemic will definitely affect how we view the role of the State, the market as an efficient channel for prosperity, and even democracy as a political system in times of crisis. It has caused the greatest emotional shock since the Great Depression: the realization of our true vulnerability as humans. In democratic societies, that sentiment will play out in elections, bringing opportunities as well as major …
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The coronavirus will change the way we live. The pandemic will definitely affect how we view the role of the State, the market as an efficient channel for prosperity, and even democracy as a political system in times of crisis. It has caused the greatest emotional shock since the Great Depression: the realization of our true vulnerability as humans. In democratic societies, that sentiment will play out in elections, bringing opportunities as well as major threats. Developing a political agenda - and campaigning for election - will be a changed, complex and challenging endeavor. The Good Society Forum brings together three leaders from Peru, Ukraine and the United States. Please join us for a webinar panel hosted by Emma Sky (Director, Yale World Fellows) and Nizam Uddin (Senior Head of Mosaic and Community Integration, The Prince’s Trust, and 2019 Yale World Fellow). Register via Zoom at: https://yale.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_aGYXac2STm2DzeckqUs18g Our panelists are: Julio Guzman: 2021 Presidential candidate in Peru, leader and founder of the Partido Morado (The Purple Party), a centrist-political national party (2018 World Fellow) Olena Sotnyk: Ukrainian politician, lawyer, and human rights defender (2019 World Fellow) Jake Sullivan: former national security adviser to US Vice President Joe Biden and director of policy planning, U.S. Department of …
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Good Society Forum: COVID-19, Climate Change and Conflict Resolution

Online
Climate change affects everyone – and is a threat multiplier. During the pandemic, our air has become less polluted due to the dramatic drop in carbon emissions from halted industrial output and declining energy demands. The sweeping policy responses to COVID-19 have revealed that governments could tackle climate change if they could muster the same focus and zeal they brought to bear on the coronavirus crisis. How do we get politicians to treat climate change …
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Climate change affects everyone – and is a threat multiplier. During the pandemic, our air has become less polluted due to the dramatic drop in carbon emissions from halted industrial output and declining energy demands. The sweeping policy responses to COVID-19 have revealed that governments could tackle climate change if they could muster the same focus and zeal they brought to bear on the coronavirus crisis. How do we get politicians to treat climate change with the same sense of urgency and intensity as COVID-19? What is being done to prepare our countries for the effects of climate change? What more needs to be done to build up resilience? On 24 May, we will hear from environmentalists from China, South Asia, the Middle East and Europe, of the opportunities to create solidarity and mobilize constituencies in the face of climate change. Please register via Zoom at: https://yale.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_dTatY1SfTPaM1DyTSsYMvA Our panelists are: Gidon Bromberg, Israeli co-founder of Ecopeace, a regional organization that brings together Jordanian, Palestinian, and Israeli environmentalists to promote sustainable development and advance peace efforts in the Middle East (2007 Yale World Fellow) Shuang Liu, Senior Associate, World Resources Institute Rafay Alam, Pakistani environment lawyer and activist (2014 Yale World Fellow) Janet Dalziell, recently of Greenpeace, …
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Good Society Forum: Will the coronavirus change the future of food?

Wednesday, May 27, 2020 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
Online
The current pandemic has had a dramatic effect on how we produce, distribute and consume food. Millions of people are suddenly going hungry. Restaurants around the world have shuttered - some of them, permanently. Some farmers have no way of selling their produce, and fishermen have given up going out to sea because no one is in the market for seafood. In developing countries, food markets have turned into major contagion hotspots. And yet, never …
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The current pandemic has had a dramatic effect on how we produce, distribute and consume food. Millions of people are suddenly going hungry. Restaurants around the world have shuttered - some of them, permanently. Some farmers have no way of selling their produce, and fishermen have given up going out to sea because no one is in the market for seafood. In developing countries, food markets have turned into major contagion hotspots. And yet, never before have we, as a society, thought as long and hard about how we eat, how to cook healthily, and how urban agriculture could, potentially, help more of us eat better. We will hear from a diverse panel from across different sectors of food systems about the challenge and opportunities to improving how we produce and consume, and how the coronavirus pandemic may impact the future of food. Please register via Zoom at https://yale.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_FpnbksxrT6CFIVeBHd_QmA. Our panelists are: Soledad Barruti, an investigative journalist whose work includes the best-selling books about food systems in Latin America, Mala Leche and Malcomidos. José Luis Chicoma, the Executive Director of Ethos Public Policy Lab who works at the intersection of food and politics (Yale World Fellow 2017). Hallie Davison, a documentary producer whose work …
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Good Society Forum: Preventing a lost generation: Supporting vulnerable young people during COVID

Online
Millions of young people have seen their lives disrupted because of measures taken by Governments to protect their citizens against COVID-19. Many are not able to go to school, see their friends, or partake in examinations. Early research is already showing that even short absences from schooling will have a lasting impact on achievement. But what about young people across the world who are in vulnerable situations that required additional support before COVID? What additional …
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Millions of young people have seen their lives disrupted because of measures taken by Governments to protect their citizens against COVID-19. Many are not able to go to school, see their friends, or partake in examinations. Early research is already showing that even short absences from schooling will have a lasting impact on achievement. But what about young people across the world who are in vulnerable situations that required additional support before COVID? What additional measures are being taken to support our already marginalised groups of young people to prevent a further loss of a generation? On 3 June, we will hear from experts from Bangladesh, the US, and South Africa, of the efforts underway to work with young people in different vulnerable contexts and how they have adapted to deal with COVID and whether longer-term opportunities exist. Please register via Zoom at https://yale.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_lXfN7e-BTPuuFH_Gw04VNw Our panelists are: Joy Oliver: Former co-founder of IkamvaYouth, South Africa Kirsten Levinsohn: Executive Director, New Haven Reads, USA Mamoon Abdul Moktader: Senior Program Manager, Save the Children, Bangladesh The Good Society Forum is a community of change-makers around the world with a common quest to build the good society. Launched in April 2020 during the COVID-19 pandemic, the Good Society Forum …
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Good Society Forum: Art and the Good Society

Online
Art and culture has an intrinsic value. It enriches individual lives. As individuals, we may enjoy visits to libraries, museums, theatres, galleries - or reading a good book or listening to a great song. But does art and culture have a societal value? Does it contribute to social cohesion, to education, to our economy? Can it help build compassion, to increase understanding of the ‘other’, to promote our common humanity? And if it can and …
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Art and culture has an intrinsic value. It enriches individual lives. As individuals, we may enjoy visits to libraries, museums, theatres, galleries - or reading a good book or listening to a great song. But does art and culture have a societal value? Does it contribute to social cohesion, to education, to our economy? Can it help build compassion, to increase understanding of the ‘other’, to promote our common humanity? And if it can and does contribute to the good society, should it be publicly funded? Joining us on 7 June are three people from the Middle East to discuss does art matter and does culture have a value? Please register via Zoom at https://yale.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_hy0Wm6W5S9-0CNb518vrAw. Our panelists are: Sultan Sooud al-Qassemi, an Emirati columnist and researcher, and is the Founder of Barjeel Art Foundation. (2018 Yale World Fellow) Myrna Ayad, an arts consultant, cultural strategist and editor. Born in Beirut, she has spent almost 40 years in the UAE. She is the former Director of Art Dubai, and former Editor of Canvas, a leading magazine for art and culture from the Middle East. Saleh Barakat, a Lebanese art expert, gallery owner and curator. (2006 Yale World Fellow) The Good Society Forum is a community of change-makers …
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Good Society Forum: How do we embed racial equity in our future vision of the good society?

Wednesday, July 1, 2020 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
Online
The coronavirus pandemic has exposed deep fault lines in our societies, including the disproportionate health and economic impact on minority communities. A recent independent report in the UK entitled Disparities in the risk and outcomes of COVID-19 confirmed Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic Groups were more likely to die from COVID-19 than their white counterparts. We have seen similar statistics in other nations including Norway and the United States. Recent global protests in response to …
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The coronavirus pandemic has exposed deep fault lines in our societies, including the disproportionate health and economic impact on minority communities. A recent independent report in the UK entitled Disparities in the risk and outcomes of COVID-19 confirmed Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic Groups were more likely to die from COVID-19 than their white counterparts. We have seen similar statistics in other nations including Norway and the United States. Recent global protests in response to the murder of George Floyd and part of the Black Lives Matter movement have once again highlighted the historical and structural nature of why this disproportionality exists in the first place, with the Dean of Harvard University’s School of Public Health stating “racism is a public health issue”. So just how do we move on from this historic moment and create a good society that truly embeds race equity at its heart? Join us as we bring together experts and practitioners from across the globe to share learnings and experiences. Please register in advance via the link below. Dr Mathew Mathews - Head of IPS Social Labs, National University of Singapore (Singapore) Athambile Masola - Lecturer, University of Pretoria (South Africa) Tebussum Rashid - Deputy CEO, Black Training and …
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Good Society Forum: Gender equality and the good society

Wednesday, July 8, 2020 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
Online
There has been progress all around the world over the last few decades in improving women’s rights. Gender equity legislation has become common. Nevertheless, family law is often discriminatory, domestic violence is widespread, and female participation in politics and public life is often low. So how do we achieve gender equality? What is the role of government, religious leaders, civil society and human rights activists? On 8 July, we will be joined by three women …
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There has been progress all around the world over the last few decades in improving women’s rights. Gender equity legislation has become common. Nevertheless, family law is often discriminatory, domestic violence is widespread, and female participation in politics and public life is often low. So how do we achieve gender equality? What is the role of government, religious leaders, civil society and human rights activists? On 8 July, we will be joined by three women from the Middle East and North Africa to discuss how Covid 19 is impacting the struggle for equal rights in their region. Please register in advance via the link below. Our panelists are: Samia Melki, a Tunisian politician who is president of Kadirat and member of the steering committee of Solidarity for African women’s rights network Randa Siniora, a human rights and women's right defender, who is currently the General Director at the Women's Center for Legal Aid and Counseling. Fatemah Khafagy, an Egyptian human rights activist and Coordinator of the Arab Women Network for Parity and Solidarity The Good Society Forum is a community of change-makers around the world with a common quest to build the good society. Launched in April 2020 during the COVID-19 pandemic, the Good Society Forum Webinars …
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